Technically Speaking

The Official Bigstep Blog

 

Is It Time for Our DB Administrator to Delve Into NoSQL?

Along with all of the media and blogging buzz about big data, NoSQL databases have crept into the headlines. Many proponents of big data are adamant that you can't really delve into big data without getting started with NoSQL too. Is it time to get your database administrator trained and ready to crank up a NoSQL database?

Along with all of the media and blogging buzz about big data, NoSQL databases have crept into the headlines. Many proponents of big data are adamant that you can’t really delve into big data without getting started with NoSQL too. Is it time to get your database administrator trained and ready to crank up a NoSQL database?

What is NoSQL?

 

If you have varied sets of data, users, and devices to contend with, NoSQL is a great tool.

 

SQL databases are relational and deal with schematics. Conversely, NoSQL databases do not use a relational model, and are schema-less. NoSQL is mostly open source, though not exclusively, and built with modern Web architectures in mind. One of the most prominent differences is that NoSQL runs well on clusters, unlike its relational ancestor. It isn’t necessary to convert structures in memory to a relational structure, making NoSQL ideal for storing and retrieving unstructured data.

The term “NoSQL” started as a hashtag used to discuss its development and is short for “Not Only SQL.” NoSQL is better suited for enormous quantities of data, data that is heterogeneous (varied in type and coming from disparate sources), and data that needs to be readily and instantly accessible to lots of different users on many different computers and devices.

What is NoSQL Useful for?

NoSQL is a much better database model for big data, such as the unstructured data generated by social media posts, likes, shares, follows, comments, etc. It offers tremendous write performance and super fast access. When accessibility is more important than reliability, NoSQL is a clear winner.

Though NoSQL requires programmers and developers to think much differently about the data and storage than does SQL, it does offer easy maintenance, administration, and operations. In circumstances where you simply can’t allow a single point of failure to bring everything down, NoSQL is ideal.

NoSQL is also an excellent choice for parallel computing, and is relatively easy for experienced programmers to learn once they understand how it works differently and handles data differently than SQL.

Since NoSQL performs much better in a cluster environment than does its counterpart, it works great for situations when data sprawl becomes an issue. For example, in addition to massive data gathering, processing, and storage on a daily basis, social media platforms also have to plan for a highly scalable future, as these data streams multiply quickly and significantly. NoSQL is great for offering this scalability and flexibility on clusters.

When is NoSQL Not a Good Solution?

 

NoSQL handles the data much differently than SQL, but most skilled programmers and administrators have no trouble learning it.

 

Though practical and useful in many situations, there are times when SQL outperforms. NoSQL is not the best model for OLTP, ad hoc queries, complicated relationships among the data, and situations when stability and reliability outweigh the importance of speed.

If a NoSQL database sounds like the best solution for your situation, consider the power, speed, and flexibility of the Full Metal Cloud.

Got a question? Need advice? We're just one click away.
Sharing is caring:TwitterFacebookLinkedinPinterestEmail

Readers also enjoyed:

Bigstep presents O'Reilly webcast on getting the most from a NoSQL DB

Many IT directors are failing to get the optimum performance from their infrastructure. So¬†we've been conducting a number of benchmarking studies to see…

How to Get Everyone on Board with Your Big Data Initiatives

You've read the blogs and seen the news: big data is here and you're convinced it's an excellent solution for your organization. But not everyone agrees.…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

* Required fields to post your comments.
Please review our Privacy Notice in order to understand how we process your personal data and what are your rights in this respect.